Army Community Service (ACS)

Fort Detrick

Mon 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tue 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wed 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thu 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Fri 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Sat Closed
Sun Closed
US Holidays Closed

Contact

Freedman Drive
Building 1520, Room 124

DSN:
(312)343-2197

Commercial:
+1 (301)619-2197

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Forest Glen Satellite Office

Mon 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Tue Closed
Wed Closed
Thu Closed
Fri 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sat Closed
Sun Closed
US Holidays Closed

Contact

2460 Linden Lane
Building 161

DSN:
N/A

Commercial:
+1 (301)295-7001

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Army Community Service (ACS) offers many programs and services that are designed to equip Service Members, DoD Civilians and Families with the skills, knowledge and support they need to face the challenges of military life. Whether you change duty stations, deploy, manage the Family during deployment or adapt to new situations, ACS has a program to help you and your Family adjust.

Events
Learn About Army Life

Army Family Team Building (AFTB)

Army Family Team Building is a series of training modules taught through your local Army Community Service or Family Program’s office that cover topics such as basic information about the Army, personal growth skills and leadership skills. AFTB improves personal and Family preparedness which enhances overall Army readiness and helps America’s Army adapt to a changing world.

AFTB helps you to not just cope with, but enjoy the military lifestyle. Many of the courses can be applied toward resume’ and career building, self-development and leadership skills. AFTB provides the knowledge and self-confidence to take responsibility for yourself and your Family. The training is available to Soldiers, Family members of all Soldiers, Department of Defense civilians and volunteers

My Army OneSource: Army Family Team Building

Contact your AFTB Program Manager more information!

New to the Community?

Information & Referral Program

This program offers a special Host Nation Services which includes uncertified translations of German correspondence and bills. An ACS representative will help you translate and understand your utility and Telekom bills.

A comprehensive resource file provides information on both military and civilian agencies to Soldiers, family members and DA civilians. Trained personnel will assist clients to find the appropriate and available resources.

For further assistance or help feel free to contact ACS.

Relocation Readiness Program

Welcome to Relocation Readiness! Moving is a part of life for Soldiers, Government Civilians and their Families. The Army Community Service Relocation Readiness Program provides assistance to the Total Army Family. We are dedicated to ensuring our clients are capable of surviving and thriving through the PCS and ETS processes. We have developed this program to assist you in finding information and resources to make you more resilient and agile as you navigate your next move.

Your first stop once you are notified of a pending PCS or ETS move should be your local ACS (Family Center) where you can meet with a Relocation Readiness Program Manager who will serve as a subject matter expert in assisting you through the process.

 

Household Goods Lending Closet

When relocating to a new installation, you can borrow basic household good such as: 

  • Pots and pans 
  • Dishes 
  • High chairs and car safety seats
  • GPS
  • Pre-paid cell phones
  • Kitchen appliances

Contact the ACS Relocation Manager for more information.

Adjusting to My New Country 

Host Nation Orientation offers all in-processing personnel and their Families orientation on the local culture, language, transportation and tourism offerings. 

Contact your Relocation Program Manager for more information!

 

Career Guidance and Employment Opportunities 

The Employment Readiness Program (ERP) provides services to military Spouses, active duty Military, active Reserve and National Guard, Wounded Warriors, Retirees, DoD Civilians, and all Family Members. Services include:

- Up-to-date resource information on available local, national and international employment opportunities, job market trends, and education and volunteer resources.

- Classes and seminars on self-assessment and career exploration, resume writing, interviewing techniques, dressing for success, networking, and entrepreneurship.

- Resume critiques

- Career counseling and individual career assessments.

- Job fairs and other hiring events.

- Teen/youth employment Information

- Computers with internet access, resume writing software, and typing tutorials

Contact your Employment Readiness Program Manager for more information!

Financial Readiness Program

The Army is here to help provide you with information on matters dealing with money. From financial calculators to tax preparation, these tools can help you on your way to financial success

Volunteer

Army Volunteer Corps can link volunteers with local volunteering opportunities.

What can volunteering do for you?  

  • Gain a sense of satisfaction/achievement by meeting challenges
  • Learn about the Army, its sister services, and the community
  • Acquire new skills and/or expand old ones
  • Obtain work experience
  • Build new friendships and become a cohesive part of the community

Army OneSource: Find Volunteer Opportunities In Your Community

Contact your Volunteer Corps Coordinator for more information!

Family Members with Special Needs

The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) is a mandatory enrollment program that works with other military and civilian agencies to provide comprehensive and coordinated community support, housing, educational, medical, and personnel services to Families with special needs. Soldiers on active duty enroll in the program when they have a Family member with a physical, emotional, developmental, or intellectual disorder requiring specialized services so their needs can be considered in the military personnel assignment process.

Family members must be screened and enrolled, if eligible, when the Soldier is on assignment instructions to an OCONUS area for which command sponsorship/Family member travel is authorized, and the Soldier elects to serve the accompanied tour. This screening consists of medical records review for all Family members, and developmental screening for all children 72 months of age and younger.

Soldiers are responsible for keeping their EFMP enrollment current as exceptional Family member (EFM) conditions change or at least every three years, whichever comes first.

The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) provides an all-inclusive approach for community, educational, medical, housing and personnel services for Families with special needs. An exceptional Family member may be a child or an adult with any physical, emotional, developmental or intellectual disorder that limits the individual's capacity to engage in pursuits with peers or that requires:

  • Special treatment
  • Therapy
  • Education
  • Training

Respite Care Information Army One Source: Exceptional Family Member Respite Care Program

Enrollment and Screening Information US Army Medical Department: Exceptional Family Member Program

Contact your ACS EFMP Manager for assistance!

Survivor Outreach Services

Our Fallen Warriors have paid the ultimate sacrifice. The Army has a commitment to their Families. Families deserve our respect, gratitude and the very best we can provide. The purpose of SOS is to deliver on that commitment:

-          By providing access to support, information and services

-          Closest location to where the Survivor resides

-          When and for as long as they desire

SOS offers support through:

Benefits Coordinators. No one is ever fully prepared to lose a loved one, which is why we have Benefits Coordinators. Benefit Coordinators are located at the Casualty Assistance Center and are there to assist and guide you as you make the many decisions necessary following the death of a Soldier. Benefits Coordinators help identify your specific benefits and entitlements and ensure you receive what is legally yours. They assist you in completing paperwork and navigating the various agencies Survivors encounter. Benefits Coordinators remain current on changes in the law and have a wealth of information available to support you during this very difficult time.

Financial Counselors. In times of emotional distress, figuring out what to do about finances can create a heavy burden. Survivor Outreach Services Financial Counselors provide professional financial information and services in areas such as investing, estate planning, tax issues and basic budgeting. Our Financial Counselors will be there when you need them, for as long as you need them. They are committed to assisting you in creating your financial security and ensuring you receives the necessary information to make sound financial decisions.

Support Coordinators. The Survivor Outreach Services Support Coordinator provides long term support to you and is your link to the Army Family for as long as your desire. Wondering what direction to go in now? Your local Support Coordinator is happy to sit down with you as you journey through this transition by providing direct services as well as information, referrals and recommendations. They can also connect you with support groups, bereavement and financial counselors, as well as help you request copies of documents obtain answers to questions and direct you to additional Survivor resources.

For more information contact your local SOS Support Liaison!
My Army OneSource: Survivor Outreach Services

Warriors in Transition assigned to the Warrior Transition Unit (WTU)

Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC) services will be tailored and responsive to the needs of the WT and their Families. Most services will be present in the SFAC location in order to maximize the convenience to the WTs and their Families. Other services requiring less than a full-time presence will be brought forward to the SFAC at designated times. Still other services will be provided through priority off-site appointments coordinated by the SFAC staff. SFAC sites will provide a warm, relaxed environment where Soldiers and their Families can gather to foster physical, spiritual and mental healing.

The services identified to date to be present or coordinated in the SFAC are:

-          Entitlement and Benefits Counseling

-          Military Personnel Services, such as ID cards

-          Educational Services

-          Transition/Employment Assistance

-          Social services to include financial counseling, stress management, translator coordination and Exceptional Family Member services

-          Travel pay for Family members on Invitational Travel Orders (ITO)

-          Substance Abuse information and referral for Family members

-          Coordination of Legal and Pastoral Services

IMCOM: Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC)

Contact your local SFAC Representative for more information!

Violence Prevention and Education

The US Army Family Advocacy Program is dedicated to the prevention, education, prompt reporting, investigation, intervention and treatment of spouse and child abuse. The program provides a variety of services to soldiers and families to enhance their relationship skills and improve their quality of life. This mission is accomplished through a variety of groups, seminars, workshops and counseling and intervention services.

  • Emergency Placement Care Program (EPC)
  • Victim Advocacy Program (Domestic Violence)
  • Sexual Harassment and Assault Response Program (SHARP)
  • FAP education and prevention
  • New Parent Support Program (NPSP) 
  • Support groups and enrichment classes

Contact the Family Advocacy Program Manager to begin!

Sexual Harassment Assault Response and Prevention: 

SHARP 24-hour Response Hot Line: 877-995-5247

Victim Advocacy Program

The Family Advocacy Program: Victim Advocacy Services Program provides comprehensive assistance and support to victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault, including crisis intervention, safety planning, and assistance in securing medical treatment for injuries, information on legal rights and proceedings, and referral to military and civilian shelters and other resources available to victims. Victim Advocacy services are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week to Soldiers and Family members

 

New Parent Support Program

The Army’s New Parent Support Program is a key secondary prevention program within the Family Advocacy Program which falls under the umbrella of Army Community Service. Established in 1995, this voluntary participation program helps Soldiers and Family members who are expecting a child, or have a child or children up to 3 years of age, to build strong, healthy military families. Through a variety of supportive services including home visits, support groups and parenting classes, the NPSP helps Soldiers and Families learn to cope with stress, isolation, post-deployment reunions and the everyday demands of parenthood.

 

Deployment or Mobilization Assistance

Welcome to Mobilization and Deployment! Our mission is to provide training, information and assistance to Soldiers, Civilians and their Families to maintain individual readiness throughout the entire deployment cycle. Deployments can be challenging—a highly emotional and stressful event for Soldiers, Civilians and their Families. Fortunately, Mobilization and Deployment is here to provide guidance, resources and training for all; Soldiers, Civilians and their families; to include parents, Family Readiness Group members and Rear Detachment cadre and ACS/Reserve staff throughout the Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN) cycle. Whether supporting deploying units by providing pre-deployment information and material to Soldiers, Civilians and their Families; to providing reintegration and RESET training as they reconstitute their Family unit, the Mobilization and Deployment Team is here to support you! Our TEAM is always ready to provide quality service for our Soldiers, Civilians and their Families.

"ARMY STRONG, FAMILY STRONG"

SNAP-Special Needs Accommodation Process

What is Special Needs Accommodation Process (SNAP)? The Special Needs Accommodation Process (SNAP) is a multidisciplinary team established  to ensure the most appropriate placement of children with special needs.  The team meets to review any new applications that indicate any possible special needs to review concerns regarding children already placed in Child, Youth and School Services (CYSS) programs.

Who may be referred to the SNAP?
Any child who has a special need who is eligible to use CYSS. Categories of eligibility include: children of contractors, civilians, employees, active duty military, and military retirees.

Children who have:

  • asthma
  • attention deficit disorder
  • diabetes
  • autism
  • epilepsy
  • down's syndrome
  • seizure disorders
  • physically challenged
  • learning disabilities
  • sensory impairment (hearing/vision)
  • developmental replays
  • speech/language impairment


Who are SNAP members?
Exceptional Family Member Program Manager Army Public Health Nurse Child and Youth Training and Curriculum Specialists Child, Youth and School Services Coordinator Child, Youth and School Services Program directors or Trainers Appropriate Experts Parents/Sponsors/Guardian

May I be present when my child is reviewed?
Yes! It is mandatory that a least one parent or legal guardian attend. According to the EFMP regulation, AF 608-75, 22 Nov 2006. Children will NOT be able to start in any CYSS programs until the review is completed.  You will be informed of the date, time, and location of the SNAP meeting.  In order to assist the team, you may be asked to bring specific information such as:

Medical documentation detailing developmental delays, illnesses, the severity of allergies (exposure, reactions, and treatments), prescription medications, and your expectations of services to be provided by the CYSS staff as well as Educational and Developmental Intervention Program Information regarding developmental evaluations, services provided etc.

Normally, a SNAP review will take between 1/2 hour to 45 minutes.  A SNAP review needs to be held only once a year unless there are changes in the child's special needs, i.e. medications, treatment, diagnosis, etc.

If I am not happy with my child's placement in childcare programs, may I request another meeting?
Certainly!  The team reconvenes if a child's needs change, if the parents desire a different program placement, or if a child seems to be experiencing difficulties in the current placement. Parents may request a SNAP at any time.  Contact the Exceptional Family Member Program Manager.

Are providers trained to care for my child's need?
All CYSS providers are trained and experienced to meet the needs of children with special needs.  If your child presents a situation new to the staff, they will receive specialized training before your child is entrusted to their care.

When does SNAP meet?
Once a month.  Call for dates and locations. 

Relocation Readiness

Information, Referral and Follow-up (I, R&F) Program

I, R&F supports soldiers, civilians, and their families relocating from installation to installation.

Services include in-processing, out-processing, Permanent Change of Station (PCS), Newcomer's briefings, Sponsorship training, Home buyer, and Re-entry workshops, Welcome packets, worldwide installation information files and Lending Closet are also available.

The Relocation Readiness Program is located at Army Community Service, we provide relocation counseling, guidance and planning services for your next move.

Family Readiness Group

The Family Readiness Group (FRG) is organized to provide mutual support for a unit's family members. FRG forms the third component of the Army's family support system during deployment. It operates during periods of normal operations, as well, in close coordination with the affiliated unit and, if convenient, with ACS or the Reserve Component Family Program Coordinator's Office. The FRG also serves as an important source of inspiration, training, and support to empower Army families to increase and enhance their self-reliance.

Goals of the Family Readiness Group: To provide an opportunity for family members to mutually support each other, prevent isolation, provide information, help involve families in unit activities, and refer families to community resources when needed.

The two distinct levels of effort of Family Readiness Groups:

  • Activated function - The effort is concentrated around events such as pre-deployment and mobilization, deployment, and the immediate post-deployment periods. FRGs provide support to family members and soldiers by offering information on unit activities and meetings, and referral assistance about community resources. Activities during this level are geared toward helping family members prepare for imminent separation, cope during the separation, and to bond with other family members in the unit.
  • Sustaining function - There is a reduced degree of interaction between FRG volunteers and family members as well as within the FRG organization. This period occurs mainly during non-deployment periods. During this period, FRGs continue to update rosters of family member addresses and telephone numbers, continue regular meetings between FRG representatives and unit leaders, and, through group meetings or telephone contacts, provide welcoming, sponsorship, orientation, and networking support for new family members and families in crisis or transition.

 

Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC)

Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC)
8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Building 62, 2nd Floor
Bethesda, MD 20889
WRNMMC SFAC is American Disability Act Compliant.

Hours: Monday-Friday, 0730-1630
Phone Number: 1-301-400-0208


The Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC) is co-located with Warrior Transition Unit (WTU) to assist the wounded, ill or injured Soldiers and their Families. The SFAC is a comprehensive, centralized office that provides a variety of services to assist Soldiers and their Families with administrative and personal needs during their Transition process.

Goals:

  • Provide assistance to 100% of the Warriors in Transition that are assigned/attached to the WRNMMC WTB and their Family members
  • Co-sponsor events in support of the Warriors in Transition
  • Establish links with outside organizations to support the Warrior in Transition and their Family members
  • In-process 100% of all Warriors in Transition that are assigned or attached to the WTB
  • Market the SFAC program to allow the community to fully understand the support that is being provided
  • Maintain a data base of quick access programs that can assist with Lodging, Taxi, Rental Vehicles, Flights
  • Maintain the Client Tracking System (CTS) to account for the SFAC support provided to the WT/Family members

How does the SFAC provide the administrative services? The SFAC provides services in one of the three methods:

  • SFAC service provider is currently located in the SFAC
  • SFAC staff calls service provider forward to provide the service in the SFAC at the convenience of the WT/Family member
  • SFAC staff schedules priority appointment for the WT/Family member with a service provider at the service providers current location on the installation

What are some of the services provided by the SFAC?

Military Personnel (MILPER) - Assess the projected WT population and determine the optimum method for conducting in/out processing. Provide the Warrior in Transition and Family member with ID card & CAC Card services, Update DEERS, SGLVI, DD93, Military records and other related military documents.

Social Services Assistance (SSA) - Provide substance abuse prevention training, education, crisis intervention, information referral services, intervention and counseling to the Warriors in Transition/Family members. Coordinate and arrange respite care services for families with special needs through ACS, Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP).

Information and Referral Services (I&R) - Assess the individual and Family needs, provide information and make service referrals within the center and to external agencies. Maintain resource listings on a variety of installation, local, state, and federal agencies which offer support services to WT. Resource listings will include services to special needs' population.

Financial Counseling Services - Counsel & Educate Warriors in Transition/Family members on personal financial self-sufficiency, developing a spend plan, budget planning and development. Provide counseling & debt liquidation services to Soldiers & Family members to prevent the need for administrative and disciplinary actions. Assist Warriors and Family members with personal Financial Readiness (military pay system, entitlements, how to read the LES, checkbook management, financial counseling resources and procedures, financial planning for family separations, short-notice deployments, and PCS-moves.)

Education Counselor - Provide Army Continuing Education Services to the WT Soldiers on a priority basis. Required services include, but are not limited to, testing, information on education services, scholarships, benefits and Education counseling. Ensure all WT are familiar with the "GoArmyEd" portal procedures for applying for Army Tuition Assistance.

Outreach Program Coordinator - Responsible for linking a variety of military and civilian support services with the Soldiers/Family members who have the greatest need of and are least likely to seek out & utilize such services. The outreach concept describes a method of service delivery and an approach to community organization designed to foster self-reliance & a sense of belonging. The composition of a given community and the priority support service needs of the community typically define the character of the outreach. Obtains data by means of personal interviews, questioners, interview with NCOs, garrison and installation commanders, and consultation with service activities, such as medical treatment facilities, housing referral office, youth services, education center, and other ACS.

Social Security Administration VTC - Dedicated Social Security Administration VTC services that allow all Warriors in Transition and the IDES Soldiers to apply for social security, conduct VTC Directly with a Social Security Administration (SSA) representative and ask questions directly to a SSA representative.

Disabled American Veteran (DAV) - The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Transition Service Program is designed specifically for active duty Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines making the all-important transition back to civilian life. The DAV Representative support WT's with pre-discharge transition assistance, DOD Medical Records review and medical debriefing for chronic illness or residuals of injuries caused or aggravated by military service. This service assures benefit accessibility and protects those injuries/illnesses in the future with the documentation for claim submission.

Chaplain - Provided on and off-site through WTB Chaplains, religious Services are available to support WT's and their families. Services include counseling, religious support, pastoral care, rites and sacraments. Supply materials and references that support counseling situation and spiritual needs are available.

SFAC Computer Lab - SFAC Computer Lab/Lounge: Free internet access, Wi-Fi and the SFAC staff on hand to assist the Warriors in Transition and there Family members with accessing links, USAJOBS, working on resumes, education, grants, DA Forms, printing, etc.

Army Emergency Relief (AER)

vz_acs_aerlogo_750x421_jan14.jpg

Army Emergency Relief (AER) provides financial assistance to Soldiers, retirees, Family members, surviving spouses, and orphans when there is a valid emergency. There are also scholarship opportunities and grants to Wounded Warriors available. The office works with other relief agencies to assist all military personnel and their Families.

Categories of authorized emergency financial assistance include:non-receipt of pay, theft of funds, medical expenses, funeral expenses, required travel, rent, utilities, food, repairs for privately-owned vehicles, clothing, repair of HVAC, cranial helmets, privation, and fire or other disaster.

Under the AER Commander's Referral Program the authorized limit increased to $1,500 on 01 AUG 2011. The repayment period may be extended from 12 up to 15 months. All other conditions/requirements of the Program remain the same.

For financial emergencies after duty hours, contact Armed Forces Emergency Services (AFES) Center at 1-877-272-7337.

AER Forms

Visit the official Army AER Website.

Army Family Action Plan (AFAP)

AFAP Crest Logo

Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) is the Army's grassroots process to identify and elevate the most significant quality of life issues impacting Soldiers (all components), Retirees, Department of Army (DA) Civilians, and Families to senior leaders for action.

Information provided through the AFAP process gives commanders and leaders insight into current satisfaction detractors, quality of life needs, and expectations of Army constituents. Leadership uses the information to effect changes that improve standards of living and support programs. These changes foster a satisfied, informed, and resilient Army Community.

The AFAP is a year-round process that begins at the installation or unit level. It is the preeminent means for commanders at all levels to learn of and seek solutions to the concerns of their communities. The Army is the only Service with a program like AFAP.

How AFAP Works

The AFAP process begins at the installation or community level. Each Installation conducts an annual AFAP forum. Members of the global Army family identify, develop and set priorities for issues. The delegates to the AFAP conference consist of Program Managers, Volunteers, DA civilians, Retirees, Active and Reserve Component soldiers and Family Members. Many of the identified issues are specific to the installation and can be resolved at that level.

Issues are assigned to the office that has responsibility for resolving the issue. The installation Executive Management Group reviews the issues and monitors them until they are resolved. Issues beyond the scope of an installation commander that require a higher level of authority go forward to the MACOM or to HQDA.

To enter an issue for consideration by the Headquarters Department of Army (HQDA), use the AFAP Issue Management System.

Click the links below to see previously submitted issues details:

2013-2011 AFAP Issues

Violence Prevention and Education

The US Army Family Advocacy Program is dedicated to the prevention, education, prompt reporting, investigation, intervention and treatment of spouse and child abuse. The program provides a variety of services to soldiers and families to enhance their relationship skills and improve their quality of life. This mission is accomplished through a variety of groups, seminars, workshops and counseling and intervention services.

  • Emergency Placement Care Program (EPC)
  • Victim Advocacy Program (Domestic Violence)
  • Sexual Harassment and Assault Response Program (SHARP)
  • FAP education and prevention
  • New Parent Support Program (NPSP) 
  • Support groups and enrichment classes

Contact the Family Advocacy Program Manager, 301-619-7171/7453, to begin!

Victim Advocacy Program

The Family Advocacy Program: Victim Advocacy Services Program provides comprehensive assistance and support to victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault, including crisis intervention, safety planning, and assistance in securing medical treatment for injuries, information on legal rights and proceedings, and referral to military and civilian shelters and other resources available to victims. Victim Advocacy services are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week to Soldiers and Family members.

Domestic Violence Victim Advocate 24-hour Hot Line: 301-514-9544

Women's Empowerment Group (WEG)

An educational support group offered to women who are currently experiencing or have experienced domestic violence and wish to overcome obstacles which prevent self sufficiency.  The group is held weekly with exercises and education on domestic violence.  Women will have a safe place to discuss their concerns and network.  Please call 301-619-7415/0314 for further information.

New Parent Support Program

The Army’s New Parent Support Program is a key secondary prevention program within the Family Advocacy Program which falls under the umbrella of Army Community Service. Established in 1995, this voluntary participation program helps Soldiers and Family members who are expecting a child, or have a child or children up to 3 years of age, to build strong, healthy military families. Through a variety of supportive services including home visits, support groups and parenting classes, the NPSP helps Soldiers and Families learn to cope with stress, isolation, post-deployment reunions and the everyday demands of parenthood.

What is Domestic Violence?

Violence is the intentional injury and/or pattern of intentional acts that affect the psychological and physical well being, safety and security of an intimate partner.  Domestic abuse essentially involves the misuse of power and exercise of control by one person over another with whom there is or has been an intimate relationship.

Physical Abuse: Occurs when one person uses physical pain or threat of physical force to intimidate another person.  Actual physical abuse may involve simple slaps or pushes, or it may involve a full physical beating to include punching, kicking, hair pulling, scratching, spitting on, threatening with a weapon and real physical damage sufficient in some cases which require hospitalization.

Psychological Abuse: Also known as emotional abuse, occurs when one person controls information available to another person so as to manipulate that person’s sense of reality; what is acceptable and what is not acceptable.  Psychological abuse often contains strong emotionally manipulative content designed to force the victim to comply with the abuser’s wishes.  It may be emotional abuse in this sense when it is designed to cause emotional pain to victims or to “mess with their heads” in attempts to gain compliance and counter any resistance.

Financial Abuse: Can take on many forms, from denying you all access to funds, to making you solely responsible for all finances while handling money irresponsibly him/herself.  Money becomes a tool by which the abuser can further control the victim, ensuring financial dependence on the abuser, or shifting the responsibility of keeping a roof over the family’s head onto the victim while simultaneously denying your ability to do so or obstructing you.

Tension Building Phase: Moodiness, sullen, faultfinding and very critical, withdraw affection, isolate partner, belittle partner, make threats

Acute Explosion Phase: Beat partner often severely, rape, attach with weapons, extremely verbally abusive

Honeymoon Phase: Apologizes, cry and beg for forgiveness, promises to get help, to go for counseling, to do “whatever it takes”, send flowers and presents, promise it will never happen again, make up sex

Reporting Options

Restricted:Restricted reporting allows a victim of intimate partner violence the option of reporting an incident of violence to the victim advocate, family advocacy program manager or social work services case manager and receive victim advocacy services and medical care without starting a law enforcement investigation or having command involvement.  It is intended to give victims the care and support they need and the extra time to make more informed decision regarding reporting to command or law enforcement.  A victim has the right to change a restricted report to unrestricted at any time within one year from the initial restricted report.

Unrestricted: Unrestricted reporting involves a victim making a report to the service members command, Family Advocacy program or Law enforcement.  The incident will be fully investigated and the victim will have access to victim advocacy services and FAP clinical services.

 What can you do to ensure safety?

  • If the situation is lethal and you can leave safely, do so
  • Contact a victim advocate or local shelter for safety planning and resources
  • Seek a civilian or military protective order
  • Change locks, add lighting and a possible alarm system or door/window sensors
  • Inform family, friends and neighbors of your situation so that they may also keep a look out
  • Tell your supervisor and/or school/daycare about your situation so that they may assist
  • Always let someone know your whereabouts, be aware of your surroundings

 Who do I call for help?

  • Fort Detrick Family Advocacy: 301-619-7171/7453
  • Fort Detrick Victim Advocate: 301-619-7415/0314
  • Heartly House 24-Hour Hotline: 301-662-8800
  • SHARP 24-hour Response Hot Line: 877-995-5247
  • Domestic Violence Victim Advocate 24-hour Hot Line: 301-514-9544
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-7233 or www.ndvh.org
  • First Call For Help: 410-685-0525
  • Directorate of Emergency Services (DES): 301-619-7114
  • Military One Source: 1-800-342-9647
  • Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence (MNADV) http://mnadv.org
  • The Women’s Law Center of Maryland: 410-321-8761 or http://www.wlcmd.org
ACS Program Contact Info

Contact information for all ACS programs:

Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) 

DSN

Civilian

AFAP Coordinator

(312)343-3171

+1 (301)619-3171

 

ACS Outreach Program

DSN

Civilian

ACS Outreach Program Manager

(312)343-3171

+1 (301)619-3171

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.survivor-outreach@mail.mil

   

 

Army Volunteer Corps

DSN

Civilian

Army Volunteer Corps Manager

(312)343-3171

+1 (301)619-3171

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.volunteer-program@mail.mil

   

 

Employment Readiness Program (ERP) 

DSN

Civilian

ERP Manager

(312)343-2208/6636

+1(301)619-2208/6636

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.acs-employment-transition@mail.mil

   

 

Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) 

DSN

Civilian

Fort Detrick EFMP Manager

(312)343-3385

+1 (301)619-3385

Forest Glen EFMP Manager

N/A

+1 (301)295-7001

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.efmp@mail.mil

   

 

Family Advocacy Program (FAP) 

DSN

Civilian

FAP Manager

(312)343-7171/7453

+1 (301)619-7171/7453

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.family-advocacy@mail.mil

   

 

Victim Advocacy Program 

DSN

Civilian

Victim Advocacy Program Manager

(312)343-7415/0314

+1 (301)619-7415/0314

Domestic Violence Victim Advocate 24-hour Hot Line:

 

301-514-9544

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.family-advocacy@mail.mil

   

 

Financial Readiness Program (FRP)

DSN

Civilian

FRP Manager

(312)343-3455/3456

+1 (301)619-3455/3456

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.financial-readiness@mail.mil

   

 

Army Emergency Relief (AER) 

DSN

Civilian

AER Manager

N/A

+1 (301)400-1994/1995

 

Relocation Readiness
Information, Referral & Follow-up Program

DSN

Civilian

Relocation Readiness Program Manager

(312)343-6364

+1 (301)619-6364

usarmy.detrick.imcom-fmwrc.mbx.relocation@mail.mil

   

 

Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC) 

DSN

Civilian

Soldier and Family Assistance Center Manager

N/A

+1 (301)400-0208

 

Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP)

DSN

Civilian

Fort Detrick, Safe Helpline

Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC)

(312)343-8229

+1 (301)619-8229

+1 (240)674-2802

Click here for Sexual Assault/Harassment Hotline

You can also contact the below assistance telephone numbers:

Child and Spouse Abuse Hotline

DSN

Civilian

Fort Detrick Child and Spouse Abuse Hotline 24/7

(312)343-7114

+1 (240)674-2802

Forest Glen Child and Spouse Abuse Hotline 24/7

N/A

+1 (301)295-7545 

 

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